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Post 09/01/2015

September 1 Cowlitz Fish Report

During five days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator, last week Tacoma Power recovered: 334 summer-run steelhead, 278 spring Chinook adults, 26 jacks, 4 mini-jacks, 73 fall Chinook adults, 13 jacks, one coho adult and three cutthroat trout.
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Post 08/03/2015

August WDFW Weekender Report for SW Washington

Drought-related fishing closures: For more information on the 2015 Washington Drought, click here.

Fishing: Nearly a million fall chinook salmon are expected to start moving up the Columbia River this month, following strong returns of spring and summer runs that sent thousands of anglers home with chinook salmon in recent months. Other prospects in August include coho salmon, summer steelhead, bass, walleye and trout.
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Post 07/29/2015

WDFW reducing drought effects on hatcheries

OLYMPIA – State fishery managers are working to minimize the effects of drought on fish at hatcheries across Washington state.

More than a dozen of the 83 fish hatcheries operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) are experiencing low water levels or high water temperatures as a result of this year’s drought. Those conditions increase the likelihood of disease and can be fatal for fish.
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Post 07/27/2015

Coho salmon caught in lower Columbia must be released

OLYMPIA – The early arrival of coho salmon in the lower Columbia River has prompted state fishery managers to clarify a fishing regulation issued earlier this month.

A new rule issued today specifically states that anglers must release any coho caught in waters currently open to salmon fishing from the Astoria-Megler Bridge to a point nearly 300 miles upstream on the Columbia River.
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Post 07/16/2015

Drought conditions prompt fishing closures, restrictions

OLYMPIA – State fishery managers are closing or restricting fishing on more than 30 rivers throughout Washington to help protect fish in areas where drought conditions have reduced flows and increased water temperatures.
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